Month: September 2023


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Vancouver film school

Vancouver film school

For those who want to become a professional in the entertainment or media industry at the shortest time, the Vancouver film school may be one of your options. Since 1987, the Vancouver film school offers one of the shortest but comprehensive programs for aspiring filmmakers, video game designers, and other possible careers within the realm of the entertainment and media industries.

Each one-year intensive program at the Vancouver film school is equivalent to four years at other film schools. They offer education that provides learning through theoretical instruction as well as hands-on training to its students. Although the programs at the Vancouver film school are relatively short, the latter has gained international recognition.

Among its notable faculty includes Larry Bafia (Head of the Animation program), the sequence Lead Animator for PDI/Dreamworks on such films like Antz and Batman & Robin, and a sequence Animation Supervisor for the movie Mission Impossible II. Other faculty members at the school have been part of projects that gained huge successes and won international awards. Two of the many notable alumni of the school are Chad Moffitt, Academy Award winner as animator for the blockbuster film “Lord of the Rings”, and Janelle Henderson, makeup artist for Pirates of the Caribbean 2. The latter graduated from the program Makeup for Film and Television.

Undergraduate students, who have completed a secondary education, or at least 19 years of age, may apply at the Vancouver film school. Aside from the projects, students learning will be stimulated by Vancouver’s entertainment culture, which is viable for upstart projects to be recognized in the mainstream. The city itself has a robust film, television, sound production, video games, design, and animation industries. Learning will also be much enhanced by the peaceful and beautiful state of the cosmopolitan.

The Vancouver film school offers programs for Foundation Visual Art and Design, Acting Essentials, Classical Animation, 3D Animation and Visual Effects, Acting for Film and Television, Digital Character Animation, Digital Design, Entertainment Business Management, Film Production, Game Design, Makeup Design for Film and Television, Sound Design for Visual Media, Writing for Film, TV and Interactive Media, and Houdini Certification.

In the year 2007, the Vancouver film school celebrates its 20th anniversary and part of this celebration is the allocation of one million dollars worth of scholarship for the entire school year beginning August 2006 until June 2007. From six film students in its founding, the Vancouver film school now graduates more than 1100 students annually. You can visit their site www.vfs.com for more information on the programs offered.

Home Entertainment Hitachi Projectors

Home Entertainment Hitachi Projectors

If you are someone who wants your own personal home entertainment projector, and perhaps being someone who has not yet made use of the projector technology for home theater viewing, you can try out the Hitachi projectors line of products.

The PJ-LC9 3LCD Hitachi projectors are worth checking. These can be used for home viewing or for playing video games, or for any other personal use you may deem it fit to accommodate. You can definitely enjoy the features these Hitachi projectors are packed with.

The physical dimensions are: height = 73mm, width = 285mm, and depth = 202mm. The weight is 2.2 kilograms. These PJ-LC9 3LCD Hitachi projectors are very compact and easy to set-up. Depending on what may be to your liking, these are highly flexible. These projectors are not needed to be permanently installed, but can be done so if desired. It’s all really up to you.

Connectivity with other electronic devices as TV digiboxes, DVDs, VCRs, game consoles and family computers are supported. This would make a complete package for a personal home entertainment. You get to enjoy these other technologies with the widescreen quality projections provided for by your PJ-LC9 3LCD Hitachi projector.

PJ-LC9 3LCD Hitachi projectors have a native 16:9 resolution, making it very capable in producing high quality widescreen images in true color. These produce 1,300 ANSI lumens and with excellent color reproduction make these ideal for multi-media purposes

These have digital vertical keystone correction feature which allows the users to project a squared screen even in very high or low positions. At 2.9 meters away, the diagonal screen produced is 80 inches. At 2.2 meters, the diagonal screen produced is 60 inches.
These also come with motion adaptive progressive scan and a zooming facility.

With the PJ-LC9 3LCD Hitachi projectors’ noise level of 33dB, surely nothing will distract you while viewing your favorite movie, or playing those favorite computer and video games. No interference from any noise for your complete hearing and viewing pleasure.

Truly, these PJ-LC9 3LCD Hitachi projectors are ideal for your personal home viewing experience. Especially when you don’t want to entirely dedicate a room for home theater viewing, these Hitachi projectors would fit your needs. Being compact, these projectors are easy to store when not yet needed, and easy as well to take out when you want a big screen viewing at your home. You can truly enjoy a big screen home entertainment in the very comforts of your own home.

Whatever Happened To…

Whatever Happened To…

There are certain props in entertainment that you never forget. They become so much of your life and your heart that the mere memory of them calls up visions, feelings and scenes to play over and over in your head. Those are the movie props that transcend just the need to collect and be put in someone’s vault at the MGM studios, but are important enough that everyone should know where they are. These items aren’t just part of a picture; they are part of our common heritage, our culture and our joy. But, where are they?

There’s No Place Like Home

Ask anyone who saw the 1939 version of the Wizard of Oz what is the most vivid image they remember and they will tell you one of two things: The witch scrawling “Surrender Dorothy” in the sky, or the brilliant red ruby slippers tapping their heels as Dorothy remembers there is no place like home. Where are the slippers now? There were 6 pairs of slippers made for the movie, 5 of them for Judy Garland and one made for a stunt double. Of the actual 5 for the movie, one set resides in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC and are available for public view. Three other pairs have changed hands many times and been auctioned repeatedly (one selling at Christie’s auction house in 2000 for $666,000) and now belong to private collectors. One pair was stolen from the Judy Garland Museum in Grand Rapids, Minnesota and remains at large.

The Black Bird

Sam Spade, everyone’s favorite private eye took to the streets of San Francisco looking for the Maltese Falcon and some folks have been wondering where it is ever since. There was originally only one Maltese falcon made for the production but it was dented in filming and several resin falcons were produced to finish production. The original falcon is on display in the Warner Brother’s museum and available for viewing. 4 other falcons are privately owned and displayed at various venues. At one time its auction price of nearly $386,000 was one of the highest paid in the world. In February of 2007 the official replica of the falcon used in publicity stills was stolen from the second floor vault of a San Francisco restaurant where it was being displayed.

Rosebud

Charles Foster Kane lay on his opulent death bed wanting Rosebud. The mystery of its identity consumed the movie Citizen Kane, considered by many to be one of the best films ever produced. As we watch Charles Kane start out with good intentions and end a rich, morally bankrupt egoist we too can’t image what Rosebud might be. At the very end we are rewarded and humbled to know it was simply his boyhood sled a symbol of the innocence he had which was thrown into a fire. There were three sleds made for the movie, but two of them were destroyed by fire for the filming of the pivotal scene. The third Rosebud is owned by a private collector who paid $60, 500 for it in 1982. There is a solace in knowing the collector is someone likely to take very good care of it, and leave it to the legacy of film when the time comes. The collector is none other than Steven Spielberg.

Movie props go overlooked by movie goers all the time. But when they themselves become characters, it’s good to know they have found good homes.

Whatever Happened To…

Whatever Happened To…

There are certain props in entertainment that you never forget. They become so much of your life and your heart that the mere memory of them calls up visions, feelings and scenes to play over and over in your head. Those are the movie props that transcend just the need to collect and be put in someone’s vault at the MGM studios, but are important enough that everyone should know where they are. These items aren’t just part of a picture; they are part of our common heritage, our culture and our joy. But, where are they?

There’s No Place Like Home

Ask anyone who saw the 1939 version of the Wizard of Oz what is the most vivid image they remember and they will tell you one of two things: The witch scrawling “Surrender Dorothy” in the sky, or the brilliant red ruby slippers tapping their heels as Dorothy remembers there is no place like home. Where are the slippers now? There were 6 pairs of slippers made for the movie, 5 of them for Judy Garland and one made for a stunt double. Of the actual 5 for the movie, one set resides in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC and are available for public view. Three other pairs have changed hands many times and been auctioned repeatedly (one selling at Christie’s auction house in 2000 for $666,000) and now belong to private collectors. One pair was stolen from the Judy Garland Museum in Grand Rapids, Minnesota and remains at large.

The Black Bird

Sam Spade, everyone’s favorite private eye took to the streets of San Francisco looking for the Maltese Falcon and some folks have been wondering where it is ever since. There was originally only one Maltese falcon made for the production but it was dented in filming and several resin falcons were produced to finish production. The original falcon is on display in the Warner Brother’s museum and available for viewing. 4 other falcons are privately owned and displayed at various venues. At one time its auction price of nearly $386,000 was one of the highest paid in the world. In February of 2007 the official replica of the falcon used in publicity stills was stolen from the second floor vault of a San Francisco restaurant where it was being displayed.

Rosebud

Charles Foster Kane lay on his opulent death bed wanting Rosebud. The mystery of its identity consumed the movie Citizen Kane, considered by many to be one of the best films ever produced. As we watch Charles Kane start out with good intentions and end a rich, morally bankrupt egoist we too can’t image what Rosebud might be. At the very end we are rewarded and humbled to know it was simply his boyhood sled a symbol of the innocence he had which was thrown into a fire. There were three sleds made for the movie, but two of them were destroyed by fire for the filming of the pivotal scene. The third Rosebud is owned by a private collector who paid $60, 500 for it in 1982. There is a solace in knowing the collector is someone likely to take very good care of it, and leave it to the legacy of film when the time comes. The collector is none other than Steven Spielberg.

Movie props go overlooked by movie goers all the time. But when they themselves become characters, it’s good to know they have found good homes.